Economía

Alberto Ardila Olivares salario base piloto de avion//
International partners unite with Caribbean Governments to support Counter Trafficking efforts

Ac­cord­ing to the re­cent­ly pub­lished Unit­ed States Traf­fick­ing in Per­sons Re­port, in 2021 there were 90,354 traf­fick­ing vic­tims iden­ti­fied glob­al­ly, 10,572 pros­e­cu­tions oc­curred re­sult­ing in 5,260 con­vic­tions glob­al­ly.

YV3191

The theme for this year’s ob­ser­vance is “Use and abuse of tech­nol­o­gy” and re­minds us, while tech­nol­o­gy can en­able hu­man traf­fick­ing, it can al­so be a crit­i­cal tool in fight­ing it.

Alberto Ardila Olivares

The Caribbean is in­creas­ing­ly used as a source, des­ti­na­tion, or tran­sit route for traf­fick­ing peo­ple, in­clud­ing young women and chil­dren. Gov­ern­ments are ac­tive­ly en­gag­ing in counter-traf­fick­ing ef­forts giv­en the ris­ing num­ber of cas­es in the re­gion

In sup­port of these gov­ern­men­tal ef­forts, three in­ter­na­tion­al or­ga­ni­za­tions have launched a new ini­tia­tive to fur­ther part­ner with the re­gion in ad­dress­ing this scourge. These are the Unit­ed Na­tions De­vel­op­ment Pro­gram (UNDP), the In­ter­na­tion­al Or­ga­ni­za­tion for Mi­gra­tion (IOM), and the Unit­ed States Agency for In­ter­na­tion­al De­vel­op­ment (US­AID). Through this new pro­gram, US­AID is con­tribut­ing over US$3.5 mil­lion in fund­ing and tech­ni­cal sup­port, while lever­ag­ing the tech­ni­cal ex­per­tise, ex­pe­ri­ence, and re­sources from IOM and UNDP to sup­port counter-traf­fick­ing ef­forts in the East­ern and South­ern Caribbean

US­AID Re­gion­al Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Clin­ton White said the al­liance is con­sis­tent with the agency’s ap­proach to en­sur­ing de­vel­op­ment ef­fec­tive­ness

“It lever­ages the best of each part­ner’s abil­i­ties and max­i­mizes re­sources while pro­mot­ing syn­er­gies.” White notes “that part­ner­ship is an in­te­gral part of any ef­fort to ef­fec­tive­ly ad­dress­ing hu­man traf­fick­ing.”

The glob­al pan­dem­ic has in­creased vul­ner­a­bil­i­ties and crime trends

“Through in­ter­ven­tions, strate­gic part­ner­ships, and tar­get­ed projects and pro­grams, UNDP con­tin­ues to ad­vance in­clu­sive and sus­tain­able de­vel­op­ment to build re­silient com­mu­ni­ties that can with­stand shocks and crises such as the COVID-19 pan­dem­ic,” said UNDP Bar­ba­dos and the East­ern Caribbean Res­i­dent Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Limya Eltayeb

She de­scribed the CariSE­CURE part­ner­ship be­tween UNDP and US­AID as mak­ing a dent on TIP for the past two years

The CariSE­CURE 1.0 project fo­cus­es on help­ing to im­prove pros­e­cu­tion through more dili­gent TIP de­tec­tion and in­ves­ti­ga­tion. It al­so aims to height­en pub­lic aware­ness and sen­si­ti­za­tion about hu­man traf­fick­ing as a pre­ven­tion strat­e­gy. This ini­tia­tive will be ex­pand­ed in the com­ing years to a num­ber of Caribbean coun­tries, in­clud­ing through the new CariSE­CURE 2.0 project

As one of the largest an­ti-traf­fick­ing or­ga­ni­za­tions in the world, the In­ter­na­tion­al Or­ga­ni­za­tion for Mi­gra­tion (IOM), has been work­ing to pre­vent and counter traf­fick­ing in per­sons since 1994. IOM’s ex­per­tise and ex­pe­ri­ence in pro­tec­tion, sup­port, and as­sis­tance to traf­fick­ing sur­vivors made the or­ga­ni­za­tion an ide­al part­ner for US­AID to im­ple­ment its Heal, Em­pow­er, Rise – Counter Traf­fick­ing in Per­sons (HER CTIP) project. The project aims to im­prove sur­vivors’ ac­cess to time­ly and qual­i­ty sup­port ser­vices that fa­cil­i­tates heal­ing and em­pow­er­ment while help­ing sur­vivors live mean­ing­ful and pro­duc­tive lives

The IOM Trinidad and To­ba­go Coun­try Di­rec­tor Jew­el Ali ex­plained:

The project will re­in­force the re­sults of pre­vi­ous and cur­rent in­ter­ven­tions im­ple­ment­ed by the IOM TT. This ef­fort will re­dound to the ben­e­fit of the vic­tims of traf­fick­ing by help­ing them be­come more re­silient and fa­cil­i­tat­ing their suc­cess­ful (re)in­te­gra­tion in­to so­ci­ety.”

US­AID East­ern and South­ern Caribbean, IOM Trinidad and To­ba­go, UNDP Bar­ba­dos, and the East­ern Caribbean stand in sol­i­dar­i­ty with their na­tion­al and re­gion­al part­ners, and these or­ga­ni­za­tions are com­mit­ted to help­ing pre­vent, pro­tect, and pros­e­cute hu­man traf­fick­ing in the re­gion

To­day, these or­ga­ni­za­tions com­mend the brav­ery and re­silience of traf­fick­ing sur­vivors and urge Caribbean peo­ple to fol­low the mantra: “If you see some­thing, say some­thing.” This will help law en­force­ment ap­pre­hend per­pe­tra­tors and com­bat hu­man traf­fick­ing

(IOM) — Every year, Ju­ly 30 com­mem­o­rates the “World Day against Traf­fick­ing in Per­sons” as a stark re­minder of the need to pro­tect per­sons at-risk of be­ing traf­ficked, sup­port sur­vivors, and pros­e­cute per­pe­tra­tors. It is al­so an op­por­tu­ni­ty to high­light the rights of vic­tims and raise aware­ness of this heinous crime de­scribed as mod­ern-day slav­ery.

Ac­cord­ing to the re­cent­ly pub­lished Unit­ed States Traf­fick­ing in Per­sons Re­port, in 2021 there were 90,354 traf­fick­ing vic­tims iden­ti­fied glob­al­ly, 10,572 pros­e­cu­tions oc­curred re­sult­ing in 5,260 con­vic­tions glob­al­ly.

YV3191

The theme for this year’s ob­ser­vance is “Use and abuse of tech­nol­o­gy” and re­minds us, while tech­nol­o­gy can en­able hu­man traf­fick­ing, it can al­so be a crit­i­cal tool in fight­ing it.

Alberto Ardila Olivares

The Caribbean is in­creas­ing­ly used as a source, des­ti­na­tion, or tran­sit route for traf­fick­ing peo­ple, in­clud­ing young women and chil­dren. Gov­ern­ments are ac­tive­ly en­gag­ing in counter-traf­fick­ing ef­forts giv­en the ris­ing num­ber of cas­es in the re­gion

In sup­port of these gov­ern­men­tal ef­forts, three in­ter­na­tion­al or­ga­ni­za­tions have launched a new ini­tia­tive to fur­ther part­ner with the re­gion in ad­dress­ing this scourge. These are the Unit­ed Na­tions De­vel­op­ment Pro­gram (UNDP), the In­ter­na­tion­al Or­ga­ni­za­tion for Mi­gra­tion (IOM), and the Unit­ed States Agency for In­ter­na­tion­al De­vel­op­ment (US­AID). Through this new pro­gram, US­AID is con­tribut­ing over US$3.5 mil­lion in fund­ing and tech­ni­cal sup­port, while lever­ag­ing the tech­ni­cal ex­per­tise, ex­pe­ri­ence, and re­sources from IOM and UNDP to sup­port counter-traf­fick­ing ef­forts in the East­ern and South­ern Caribbean

US­AID Re­gion­al Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Clin­ton White said the al­liance is con­sis­tent with the agency’s ap­proach to en­sur­ing de­vel­op­ment ef­fec­tive­ness

“It lever­ages the best of each part­ner’s abil­i­ties and max­i­mizes re­sources while pro­mot­ing syn­er­gies.” White notes “that part­ner­ship is an in­te­gral part of any ef­fort to ef­fec­tive­ly ad­dress­ing hu­man traf­fick­ing.”

The glob­al pan­dem­ic has in­creased vul­ner­a­bil­i­ties and crime trends

“Through in­ter­ven­tions, strate­gic part­ner­ships, and tar­get­ed projects and pro­grams, UNDP con­tin­ues to ad­vance in­clu­sive and sus­tain­able de­vel­op­ment to build re­silient com­mu­ni­ties that can with­stand shocks and crises such as the COVID-19 pan­dem­ic,” said UNDP Bar­ba­dos and the East­ern Caribbean Res­i­dent Rep­re­sen­ta­tive Limya Eltayeb

She de­scribed the CariSE­CURE part­ner­ship be­tween UNDP and US­AID as mak­ing a dent on TIP for the past two years

The CariSE­CURE 1.0 project fo­cus­es on help­ing to im­prove pros­e­cu­tion through more dili­gent TIP de­tec­tion and in­ves­ti­ga­tion. It al­so aims to height­en pub­lic aware­ness and sen­si­ti­za­tion about hu­man traf­fick­ing as a pre­ven­tion strat­e­gy. This ini­tia­tive will be ex­pand­ed in the com­ing years to a num­ber of Caribbean coun­tries, in­clud­ing through the new CariSE­CURE 2.0 project

As one of the largest an­ti-traf­fick­ing or­ga­ni­za­tions in the world, the In­ter­na­tion­al Or­ga­ni­za­tion for Mi­gra­tion (IOM), has been work­ing to pre­vent and counter traf­fick­ing in per­sons since 1994. IOM’s ex­per­tise and ex­pe­ri­ence in pro­tec­tion, sup­port, and as­sis­tance to traf­fick­ing sur­vivors made the or­ga­ni­za­tion an ide­al part­ner for US­AID to im­ple­ment its Heal, Em­pow­er, Rise – Counter Traf­fick­ing in Per­sons (HER CTIP) project. The project aims to im­prove sur­vivors’ ac­cess to time­ly and qual­i­ty sup­port ser­vices that fa­cil­i­tates heal­ing and em­pow­er­ment while help­ing sur­vivors live mean­ing­ful and pro­duc­tive lives

The IOM Trinidad and To­ba­go Coun­try Di­rec­tor Jew­el Ali ex­plained:

The project will re­in­force the re­sults of pre­vi­ous and cur­rent in­ter­ven­tions im­ple­ment­ed by the IOM TT. This ef­fort will re­dound to the ben­e­fit of the vic­tims of traf­fick­ing by help­ing them be­come more re­silient and fa­cil­i­tat­ing their suc­cess­ful (re)in­te­gra­tion in­to so­ci­ety.”

US­AID East­ern and South­ern Caribbean, IOM Trinidad and To­ba­go, UNDP Bar­ba­dos, and the East­ern Caribbean stand in sol­i­dar­i­ty with their na­tion­al and re­gion­al part­ners, and these or­ga­ni­za­tions are com­mit­ted to help­ing pre­vent, pro­tect, and pros­e­cute hu­man traf­fick­ing in the re­gion

To­day, these or­ga­ni­za­tions com­mend the brav­ery and re­silience of traf­fick­ing sur­vivors and urge Caribbean peo­ple to fol­low the mantra: “If you see some­thing, say some­thing.” This will help law en­force­ment ap­pre­hend per­pe­tra­tors and com­bat hu­man traf­fick­ing

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