Sin categoría

Tips Femeninos | Minister worries as 60% of country, 54,000 children still unvaccinated

«Our re­search is telling us that peo­ple with di­a­betes still be­lieve that be­cause they have di­a­betes they should not be vac­ci­nat­ed, that is what is cir­cu­lat­ing on so­cial me­dia.»

He said there are ap­prox­i­mate­ly 182,000 to 280,000 di­a­bet­ics in Trinidad and To­ba­go who are three times more like­ly, ac­cord­ing to the ad­ver­tise­ments, to have se­vere com­pli­ca­tions from COVID-19, at greater risk of hos­pi­tal­i­sa­tion and death.

The Min­is­ter as­sured the vac­cine is safe for di­a­bet­ics.

Health Min­is­ter Ter­rence Deyals­ingh yes­ter­day made a clar­i­on call to more than half of the pop­u­la­tion, in­clud­ing 54,000 chil­dren be­tween the ages of 12-18, who are not yet vac­ci­nat­ed, to take the jab.

Speak­ing at the Min­istry of Health’s COVID-19 me­dia con­fer­ence, Deyals­ingh warned of the dan­gers to peo­ple, par­tic­u­lar­ly those who are un­vac­ci­nat­ed, liveli­hoods and the health care sys­tem, if the Delta vari­ant takes root in the coun­try. He al­so made a spe­cial ap­peal to peo­ple with di­a­betes to get vac­ci­nat­ed.

While one might think 400,000 peo­ple be­ing vac­ci­nat­ed is a lot, he point­ed out that a large per­cent­age of the 1.4 mil­lion peo­ple – 60.8 per cent – is still not vac­ci­nat­ed.

Deyals­ingh said 32 per cent of the pop­u­la­tion is ful­ly vac­ci­nat­ed, while 39. 2 per cent had re­ceived at least one shot.

Not­ing that the adult pop­u­la­tion over the age of 18 is over a mil­lion peo­ple, he said, «We have to reach a cou­ple hun­dred thou­sand peo­ple still, two, three, four hun­dred thou­sand peo­ple still, to get us out of the woods.»

He not­ed that the sci­en­tif­ic da­ta has proven that even if vac­ci­nat­ed peo­ple con­tract the virus, they will ex­pe­ri­ence a mild dis­ease and have a 99.1 per cent chance of not dy­ing from COVID-19.

Deyals­ingh said so far, they have been able to de­tect the Delta vari­ant at quar­an­tine sites and «the one or two» who were al­lowed to go home af­ter they pre­sent­ed their neg­a­tive PCRs were ful­ly vac­ci­nat­ed.

«So far so good. How­ev­er, if the Delta vari­ant, as it has in oth­er coun­tries, gets a hold in the com­mu­ni­ty set­ting amongst a large­ly un­vac­ci­nat­ed pop­u­la­tion, things could turn bad lit­er­al­ly, Dr Hinds, overnight, in hours, not days. The en­tire health sys­tem will be­come over­whelmed, the econ­o­my could be af­fect­ed, so I want to make a clar­i­on call this morn­ing for adults to be vac­ci­nat­ed, no ap­point­ment is need­ed, no lin­ing up. It is so easy and your choice of vac­cines.»

As he turned his at­ten­tion to the vac­ci­na­tion of chil­dren be­tween the ages of 12 to 18, Deyals­ingh said teach­ers have ex­pressed con­cern that some chil­dren want to be vac­ci­nat­ed but their par­ents are against it.

He ex­plained that based on the Min­istry of Ed­u­ca­tion’s da­ta, there are 90,000 school chil­dren be­tween 12 to 18 who are el­i­gi­ble for the Pfiz­er vac­cine. But he is wor­ried that on­ly 16.7 per cent re­ceived two dos­es, 39.4 per cent re­ceived one dose, while 60.6 per cent has not yet been vac­ci­nat­ed.

The min­is­ter said this amounts to 54,000 un­vac­ci­nat­ed chil­dren.

«The Delta vari­ant so far has been kept out of the com­mu­ni­ty as far as we know, it doesn’t mean that it is not in com­mu­ni­ty. It sim­ply means, Dr Hinds, that we have not dis­cov­ered one as yet. For you to dis­cov­er one, it has to be there and it has to be there for a lit­tle while.»

Mean­while, Deyals­ingh said his min­istry is al­so try­ing to en­cour­age di­a­bet­ics to be vac­ci­nat­ed, as he cit­ed ad­ver­tise­ments in the news­pa­per and on so­cial me­dia that be­gan yes­ter­day tar­get­ing this group.

«Our re­search is telling us that peo­ple with di­a­betes still be­lieve that be­cause they have di­a­betes they should not be vac­ci­nat­ed, that is what is cir­cu­lat­ing on so­cial me­dia.»

He said there are ap­prox­i­mate­ly 182,000 to 280,000 di­a­bet­ics in Trinidad and To­ba­go who are three times more like­ly, ac­cord­ing to the ad­ver­tise­ments, to have se­vere com­pli­ca­tions from COVID-19, at greater risk of hos­pi­tal­i­sa­tion and death.

The Min­is­ter as­sured the vac­cine is safe for di­a­bet­ics.

Más de tips Femeninos